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Report: Feds Requested Early Release of Convicted Terrorist

The U.S. government formally requested the early release of a convicted terrorist from federal prison, despite assurances from the New York man that he continued to support the killing of American soldiers deployed in Muslim countries, ABCNews.com reports.

The U.S. government formally requested the early release of a convicted terrorist from federal prison, despite assurances from the New York man that he continued to support the killing of American soldiers deployed in Muslim countries, ABCNews.com reports.

The convicted terrorist, Mohammed Babar, was arrested in 2004 and later pleaded guilty to four counts of providing material support to Al Qaeda and one count of providing funds to Al Qaeda. He was ultimately released on bail in late 2008 after serving four years and eight months, according to ABCNews.com.

U.S. officials filed a sealed request for leniency for Babar in late 2010 due to his "extraordinary cooperation" in terror probes and sought an "appropriate reduction" in his sentence, which, according to federal guidelines, was to be between 30 and 70 years in prison upon conviction. Following the request, a judge sentenced Babar, who was born in New York City, to 10 years of supervised release and a court fee of $500.

"According to Babar," reads the Nov. 23 request for leniency, "he still supports today the killing of American military service members on battlefields in Muslim countries. Babar has advised that he also supports the killing of Americans (both military and civilian) in Muslim countries 'occupied' by the United States."

Babar joined a fundamentalist Muslim group called al-Muhajiroun while a student at the State University of New York-Stonybrook in 2000, ABCNews.com reports. Nine days after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, Babar moved to Pakistan "to provide support to the Afghan jihad," according to the leniency request.

Click for more on this report from ABCNews.com.

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